Bootstrapping POWER8 little endian and common pitfalls


gnu logoEarlier this year I was asked to bootstrap our core tools (compiler, assembler, linker, and libraries) from the ground up, to help the rest of the team in providing enough infrastructure for bootstrapping an entire OS to POWER8 little endian.  Since I spend most of my days working on the upstream development of the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC), prior to this project I hadn’t actually worked much with either RHEL’s development processes or RPM as a whole.  So leading our effort to bootstrap the tools onto a new architecture required a lot of coming up to speed.

Not being one to shy away from learning an entire new infrastructure, I accepted, and so began a 6 month ordeal fighting with everything from the assembler to GNU Emacs. Having learned so much from this project, I thought it would be good to write some of it down, both for the curious, and to help in future bootstrapping efforts.

Consequently, I’d like to give an overview of how an OS is bootstrapped, and what insights I’ve learned that can help developers in designing packages that are easy to bootstrap and bring up in new architectures. (more…)


For more information about Red Hat Enterprise Linux and other topics related to this article, visit one of these sites:  Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat Enterprise Linux Developer Program, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 is now generally available.

 


Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (November 2014): Library


gnu logoLast month I attended the ISO standardisation meeting for C++ in Urbana-Champaign. As usual I spent most of the week in the Library Working Group or Library Evolution Working Group. In LWG, about half the week was spent processing comments received from National Bodies during the ballots for the Technical Specification (TS) on C++ Extensions for Parallelism and the TS for C++ Extensions for Library Fundamentals, both of which were at the PDTS (public draft) stage.

LWG reviewed some changes to the Parallelism TS, based on National Body comments, more details of those changes can be found in Torvald’s report.

The Library Fundamentals TS received quite a few National Body comments, some of which were rejected or ruled to be out of scope for the first version of the TS, but some resulted in changes to the draft TS. One significant change to the PDTS was the removal of the generic versions of ntohs/htons/ntohl/htonl due to concerns about implementation difficulty and interference with the C library versions. The other changes to the PDTS are in the post-Urbana mailing as N4270 and N4288. With those changes the Library Fundamentals TS has moved to DTS stage. GCC’s implementations of any, optional and string_view will be updated soon to conform to the DTS. (more…)


For more information about Red Hat Software Collections or Red Hat Developer Toolset, visit developer.redhat.com/RHEL.


Take the “Winter of Code” Challenge on OpenShift – OpenShift Blog


openshift logo 121 × 121By Diane Mueller, Red Hat

What It’s All About

The Winter of Code is a challenge for the best application built on OpenShift. Winter of Code 2015 challenge is organized (and judged) by OpenShift developers from Red Hat Czech as part of the Developer Conference which takes place from February 6th to February 8th in Brno, Czech Republic.

From most practical to the most crazy, submit your applications and win fabulous prizes, such as Google Nexus Tablet and much more! The winners on each category will be announce on the DevConf 2015, where they will receive their prizes.

Read Diane’s whole article: Take the “Winter of Code” Challenge on OpenShift – OpenShift Blog.


For more information about Red Hat OpenShift and other related topics, visit: OpenShift, OpenShift Online, OpenShift Enterprise


Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (Nov 2014): Parallelism and Concurrency


gnu logoSeveral Red Hat engineers attended the JTC1/SC22/WG21 C++ Standards Committee meetings in November 2014 at Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA.  This post focuses on the sessions of SG1, the study group on parallelism and concurrency, which met for the whole week to discuss proposals and work on the technical specifications (TS) for both parallelism and concurrency.

SG1 mostly worked on finalizing the first revision of the Parallelism TS, and continued working on accepting proposals into the Concurrency TS. The Transactional Memory proposal is also making progress on becoming a TS. (more…)


For more information about Red Hat Software Collections or Red Hat Developer Toolset, visit developer.redhat.com/RHEL.


How to package proprietary software


nicubunu_PackageI like to work with open source code. But it is not always possible. Sometimes you have to deal with proprietary code. And sometimes you have to distribute it. I like to distribute software as RPM package because it allows me to put together patches, post-install scripts and configuration files. But how can I create and distribute proprietary software without violating license? The answer is “nosrc.rpm“.

For example – let assume that you want to distribute Oracle Database Server with your custom settings and patches. The oracle-server.spec file may look like this: (more…)


For more information about Red Hat Enterprise Linux and other topics related to this article, visit one of these sites:  Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat Enterprise Linux Developer Program, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 is now generally available.

 


Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (November 2014): Core


The Red Hat toolchain team was well-represented at the Fall 2014 meeting of the standardization committee (JTC1/SC22/WG21) in Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA. In this article, Jason Merrill summarizes the main highlights and developments of interest to Red Hat Enterprise Linux developers. Stay tuned for separate articles summarizing the library and concurrency working group aspects.

gnu logoThe fall meeting of WG21 (the C++ standardization committee) this year was hosted by the CS department at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  This was the first meeting after ratification of the C++14 standard, and we weren’t changing the working paper while C++14 was out for voting ISO doesn’t allow changes to the working paper while there’s an open ballot, so there was a lot of leftover business from the last few meetings that was waiting to be voted on.

As usual, I spent the week in the Core Language Working Group.  We spent the majority of the week reviewing papers for new language features. (more…)


For more information about Red Hat Software Collections or Red Hat Developer Toolset, visit developer.redhat.com/RHEL.