Red Hat Software Collections 1.2 – now GA


Red Hat today announced the general availability of Red Hat Software Collections 1.2, delivering the latest, stable versions of essential development tools, dynamic languages, open source databases, and web servers all on a separate lifecycle from Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The third installment of Red Hat Software Collections now includes vital open developer tools, such as GCC 4.9, Maven and Git, and, for the first time, makes the Eclipse IDE available on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. In addition, Red Hat is offering Dockerfiles for many of the most popular software collections, aiding in the rapid creation and deployment of container-based applications.softwarecollections-logo-colorful (more…)


For more information about Red Hat Software Collections or Red Hat Developer Toolset, visit developer.redhat.com/RHEL.


Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 GCC Optimizations – partial inlining indepth


In this prior post we mentioned several new optimization improvements in GCC for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. It’s time to dig a little deeper. In this post we will focus on partial inlining/function outlining which are part of the Inter-Procedural Analysis (IPA) framework.

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Function inlining is a well known technique to improve application performance by expanding the body of a called function into one or more of its call site(s). Function inlining decreases function call overhead, may improve icache behaviour, expose previously hidden redundancies, etc. However, the increase in total code size may be detrimental and, as a result, heuristics which drive inlining are very sensitive to code growth. Function outlining/partial inlining are variants of function inlining to allow for inlining with less code growth. (more…)


For more information about Red Hat Enterprise Linux and other topics related to this article, visit one of these sites:  Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat Enterprise Linux Developer Program, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 is now generally available.

 


Comparing ABIs for Compatibility with libabigail – Part 2


In the first article of this series of two, we ran abidiff to compare the ABIs of the libstdc++.so shared libraries from RHEL 6.5 and RHEL 7.  In this article, we are going to analyze the resulting ABI change report that was emitted.

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Analyzing the results

The report starts with a header that summarizes the ABI differences:

Functions changes summary: 0 Removed, 10 Changed (1260 filtered out), 112 Added functions
Variables changes summary: 0 Removed, 3 Changed (72 filtered out), 97 Added variables

From the:

Functions changes summary: 0 Removed,

and:

Variables changes summary: 0 Removed,

(more…)


For more information about Red Hat Enterprise Linux and other topics related to this article, visit one of these sites:  Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat Enterprise Linux Developer Program, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 is now generally available.

 


Repost: OpenShift V3 Deep Dive – The Next Generation of PaaS w/ Docker


By Ben Parees

There have been a lot of announcements lately around Red Hat’s OpenShift v3 plans, specifically around Docker and Kubernetes. OpenShift v3 is being built around the central idea of user applications running in Docker containers with scheduling/management support provided by the Kubernetes project, and augmented deployment, orchestration, and routing functionality built on top.

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This means if you can run your application in a container, you can run it in OpenShift v3. Let’s dig in and see just how you can do that with code that’s available today. I’m going to walk through the setting up OpenShift and deploying a simple application. Along the way, I’ll explain some details of the underlying components that make it all work. (more…)


For more information about Red Hat OpenShift and other related topics, visit: OpenShift, OpenShift Online, OpenShift Enterprise


Comparing ABIs for Compatibility with libabigail – Part 1


Introduction:  The challenges around ABI compatibility

Ensuring the forward compatibility of application binary interfaces (ABIs) exposed by native shared libraries has been a kind of black art for quite some time, due to many factors.

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The scope of the term ABI is quite broad, even when it is restricted to shared software libraries. It encompasses low level concepts like the binary format, the processor instructions set used in the binary, the calling convention of the operating system on a given processor architecture, as well as higher level considerations like the layout and size of the data types used by the entry points of the library. (more…)