Maintain Software Collections easily on thousands of machines using scl register


softwarecollections-logo-colorfulHere is a problem. Let’s have a company with dozens of developer workstations, while we need to maintain the same development environment on all of them.

We know the Software Collections, which store files from RPMs into /opt and thus allow us to install multiple versions of various software on the same machine, even on an enterprise platform like Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Installing packages in different versions could break things, so it is wise to use the Software Collections for that purpose.

Anyway, back to the developer workstations — we might for example set up a system to deploy the same environment stacks on multiple systems (Satellite, Puppet, Ansible), but when adding a new package to the set of available packages, we would still need to run commands on all the systems.

What may be much more handy is mounting the /opt/rh directory from one system to all the developer workstations (using NFS for example). We also can make the /opt/rh read-only, so clients cannot influence other clients.

So, let’s try it. First, we install a collection (in this case Python 3.4) on the NFS server:

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For more information about Red Hat Software Collections or Red Hat Developer Toolset, visit developer.redhat.com/RHEL.


A peek behind the scenes of OpenSource.com


At DevNation 2015, Jason Hibbets  shared a behind the scenes look at opensource.com, the talent behind it, their content strategy, and the results of the overall success of the site.

Why I liked it?

It was great to hear more about the inner workings of the opensource.com team. Most importantly, I found it very informative with specific info on how to get involved in the community that participates in the site. Read more about it– they are looking for writers!

Best Quote

“I think the future of content development is building your community. We just do it somewhat a little different because we involve our community in our content.” –Jason Hibbets

Compelling idea to use with your teams

Continue reading “A peek behind the scenes of OpenSource.com”


More about DevNation:  DevNation 2014, was our inaugural open source, polyglot conference for application developers and maintainers. Learn about DevNation and view its many recorded sessions here.  DevNation 2015 will be in Boston, MA, USA, June 23-26, 2015.  Be sure to follow its status on www.devnation.org.


Red Hat Summit & DevNation Conference Report: Day One


Cheers from Red Hat Summit and DevNation! I enjoyed sharing my experiences last year, and eagerly volunteered for the opportunity to do so again this year. I arrived in Boston yesterday at around lunch time, and didn’t have an opportunity to attend many sessions yesterday. Today was somewhat similar, except– I caught one DevNation Session, the Middleware KeyNote and Summit General Session.

Continue reading “Red Hat Summit & DevNation Conference Report: Day One”


More about DevNation:  DevNation 2014, was our inaugural open source, polyglot conference for application developers and maintainers. Learn about DevNation and view its many recorded sessions here.  DevNation 2015 will be in Boston, MA, USA, June 23-26, 2015.  Be sure to follow its status on www.devnation.org.


Container development for all: Red Hat’s Container Development Kit


RH_Icon_Container_with_App_FlatSo Docker containers are all the rage, right?  (If you didn’t know this, you do now.)  :)  For a while now, Red Hatters have already been doing a ton of upstream container work on Docker, Kubernetes, and a new item called Nulecule.

But while Docker containers have skyrocketed in popularity, there’s been no convenient means to set up a development environment for building containerized apps.  Wouldn’t it be handy to develop YOUR containerized apps for Red Hat Enterprise Linux from YOUR desktop?  Apps that you can depend on for production?

The Red Hat® Container Developer Kit (CDK) does that – it was designed to allow you to set up a Red Hat Enterprise Linux container development environment on your own desktop(s), whether running Windows®, OS X, or Linux®.

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The ARM Arc Part 3


Logotype_RH_EnterpriseLinuxServerforARM_DevPreview_RGB_Black

This week heralded the announcement of Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server for ARM Development Preview 7.1, the next milestone in Red Hat’s exploring the potential for ARM servers.  There is a lot in a name, and this one is a mouthful.

The Linux kernel is famous – it is the namesake of the complete operating system, but it does not exist on its own.  A complete OS runs on hardware, starts out in firmware, loads the kernel, which in turn loads a software and service initialization system, all of which require function libraries, all of which were built with compiler tools that do the magic conversion from human readable source code to machine readable binaries.  When ARM designed the AArch64 architecture, they also had to provide ports and specifications for the firmware, the kernel, the libraries, the compiler, and so on. Hundreds of packages were affected.  Not only did they need to provide ports, those ports needed to be designed, written correctly, in a style acceptable to each of the communities whose coding standards are frequently rigorous, distinct, and strictly enforced.  To top it all off, this work needed to be done before the actual hardware existed, necessitating writing software simulators to check all the work and extensive documentation to empower community collaboration.

Continue reading “The ARM Arc Part 3″