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New Java EE Book – Modern Java EE Design Patterns

Today is a very special day for me. I am pleased to announce that my thoughts around Enterprise Java development made it into a report and has been published by O’Reilly. The “Modern Java EE Design Patterns” mini-book is available for download as of today here. I am covering a lot of ground in this, beginning from the overall Enterprise challenges and changes over the last couple of years all the way down to microservices pattern.  With plenty of further reading about relevant technologies and team considerations, you will find resources, ideas, and best practices. And I am very proud to include a foreword by Mark Little (VP of Red Hat Engineering).

Below I’ve included the full abstract for the mini-book but in a few quick highlights, you will learn:

  • Challenges of starting a greenfield development vs tearing apart an existing brownfield application into services
  • How to examine your business domain to see if microservices would be a good fit
  • Best practices for automation, high availability, data separation, and performance
  • How to align your development teams around business capabilities and responsibilities

A big thank you goes out to Danial Bryant, Arun Gupta and Mark Little. They have been the technical reviewers for the report and been helping me shape the content into a cohesive story.

Please drop by the Red Hat booth at JavaOne or Devoxx to grab a complimentary copy and I will be spending a lot of time in the booth answering any questions you may have.   Enjoy the report.

As promised here’s the full abstract:

Modern Java EE Design Patterns

Building Scalable Architecture for Sustainable Enterprise Development

With the ascent of DevOps, microservices, containers, and cloud-based development platforms, the gap between state-of-the-art solutions and the technology that enterprises typically support has greatly increased. But as Markus Eisele explains in this O’Reilly report, some enterprises are now looking to bridge that gap by building microservice-based architectures on top of Java EE.

Can it be done? Is it even a good idea? Eisele thoroughly explores the possibility and provides savvy advice for enterprises that want to move ahead. The issue is complex: Java EE wasn’t built with the distributed application approach in mind, but rather as one monolithic server runtime or cluster hosting many different applications. If you’re part of an enterprise development team investigating the use of microservices with Java EE, this book will help you:

  • Understand the challenges of starting a greenfield development vs tearing apart an existing brownfield application into services
  • Examine your business domain to see if microservices would be a good fit
  • Explore best practices for automation, high availability, data separation, and performance
  • Align your development teams around business capabilities and responsibilities
  • Inspect design patterns such as aggregator, proxy, pipeline, or shared resources to model service interactions

Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

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