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Making SCL use a little saner

Personally, I find it difficult to remember which SCLs (software collections) I have enabled while I am doing development. Or, perhaps more likely, when I get distracted from development and I come back to the window I was using before. As a result, I added the following to my bashrc which displays in the prompt what SCLs are enabled.


if [ "$X_SCLS" ]; then
    PRETTY_SCLS=${X_SCLS// /,}
    PRETTY_SCLS=${PRETTY_SCLS/%,/}
    PS1="($PRETTY_SCLS) $PS1"
fi

Someday, maybe I’ll figure out the fancy that is powerline and rewrite this as a plugin.

So, just a short post, but I would love to hear your tricks for using software collections in the comments.

Shipping_containers_at_Clyde

Useful Dockerfiles for the RHEL-ecosystem

Shipping_containers_at_ClydeLike most programmers, I find it much easier to take some existing example of code and modify it to do what I want. Sometimes, I end up with nothing from the original source, but I still find it easier. I wonder if this is akin to writing where, I find, if you put the words down in a stream of consciousness manner, then “rewrite, rewrite, rewrite.”

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New Podcast and Interview – softwarecollections.org

If you haven’t seen it yet, Red Hat has a a site covering the things going on in our upstream communities. The site includes a blog, upcoming events, and many of the projects we contribute to.

Recently they have also added a podcast called “Upstream” where Joe Brockmeier interviews various people about what is happening (in upstream:) ).

Yesterday, he posted an interview with me about SoftwareCollections.org (our prior post) . Go check it out, and if you want to get it every week, check out the RSS feed.

Moving an RHSCL app to Docker on Atomic

As many of you have probably heard, Red Hat announced a new “Docker server” at Summit. The new server is called “Atomic” and details can be found at the project home page. As you all know, I tend to be interested in using Software Collections to ensure the portability of applications. So, putting my foot^W money where my mouth is, I decided to download Atomic, run it as a VM, create a Docker image with a Software Collection, and copy a previous app there, unchanged. The pros and cons of running an application as a Docker container are debated heavily elsewhere, so we won’t discuss the “why” (unless you tell us we should in the comments:) ), just the “how.”

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Announcing SoftwareCollections.org

Red Hat has been working on new and innovative ways to deliver alternate versions of system software for some time. In 2012, we released the 1.0 of the Red Hat Developer Toolset (DTS) which was the first product to use Software Collections. About six months ago, Red Hat took the wraps off of Red Hat Software Collections 1.0 for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). Now we’re pleased to announce SoftwareCollections.org, a project for creating, hosting, and delivering community created Software Collections for RHEL, CentOS, and Fedora.

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