An Announcement for JBoss Core Services Collection

Red Hat JBoss Core Services Collection is a group of common services that are critical for application developers. The services included change as new services and projects are added over time, but the idea is to include common, developer-friendly projects under a single subscription. The collection makes it much easier for developers to access these services.

The launch of the Core Services Collection includes services that focus on three areas: web servers, security, and monitoring.

New Components

There are six components available in the launch of Core Services Collection:

  • JBoss Operations Network, which is based on the former RHQ project (now Hawkular). From a high level, this is a monitoring and management server, but the key is that it is developed in parallel with other JBoss products, so there is tight integration with other JBoss products. This centralizes all management for JBoss middleware products and also for Java applications running on JBoss EAP.
  • An integrated single sign-on server based on the Keycloak project. This SSO server supports SAML 2.0, OAuth, and OpenID and it can work with LDAP servers and Active Directory for user identity management. Keycloak SSO makes it a lot easier to define user domains, federated identities, and client applications because it has a very simple graphical UI, as well as REST APIs.
  • The Apache Commons Jsvc daemon provides a way to manage Java virtual machines on Unix/Linux; in general, this is used as a wrapper for Java applications so that those applications can be managed by native system tools.
  • Apache HTTP server is the most-used web server in the world. Web servers are used to route traffic and load balance requests to JBoss EAP and other middleware servers.
  • Web connectors provide a connection with third-party web servers which need to interact with JBoss middleware products and may not have a native connection. For this release, there are two connectors available:
    • Microsoft IIS
    • Oracle iPlanet

Continue reading “An Announcement for JBoss Core Services Collection”


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New beta: Software Collections 2.2 and Developer Toolset 4.1

Red Hat Developer Toolset has already been available for nearly four years and Red Hat Software Collections has been out for two and a half. We’ve seen excellent adoption of these as more and more developers and customers utilize the newer technologies that become available.

So, this week we announced more with these two new beta releases.

Continue reading “New beta: Software Collections 2.2 and Developer Toolset 4.1”


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Using Vagrant Tooling in Eclipse

Vagrant gives developers a uniform way of configuring their virtual environment, regardless of the underlying hypervisor chosen (eg. KVM/QEMU, VirtualBox, VMware, Hyper-V). It’s also available for Mac OS and Windows making it easier to run virtual Linux environments from these platforms.

Today we’ll be creating a simple virtual machine, using the Eclipse Vagrant Tooling plugin. This will be shipping as part of the Linux Tools Project 4.2.0 release (along with the Docker Tooling). The Vagrant tooling is targeted to make its way into the release of DTS 4.1 (Developer Toolset) and Fedora 23.

Before using the Vagrant Tooling, we need to make sure we have all the pre-requisites installed.

Continue reading “Using Vagrant Tooling in Eclipse”


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October/November 2015 GNU Toolchain Update

Hi Everyone,

Welcome to a new blog about changes and new features in the GNU toolchain (compiler, assembler, linker and debugger).  My intention is to post monthly updates highlighting what is new in these tools so that developers can keep abreast of the developing technologies.  This first post covers changes made to the development versions tools in October and November of this year.  Earlier posts in this series can be found in my live journal blog here, but future posts will continue on this site.

Note – these features have not yet made it into released products like Fedora or RHEL, so if you want to play with them now, you will have to download the sources from the FSF and build your own toolchain.

Continue reading “October/November 2015 GNU Toolchain Update”

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GCC 5.2 and new Developer Toolset 4 now generally available

Today, Red Hat announced the general availability of Red Hat Developer Toolset 4, giving you access to the latest, stable open source C and C++ compilers and complementary development and performance profiling tools. Accessible through the Red Hat Developers Program and related subscriptions, Red Hat Developer Toolset enables developers to compile applications once and deploy across multiple versions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

New additions and updated components of Red Hat Developer Toolset 4 include:


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Get Started: Eclipse and Python with PyDev in Developer Toolset 4.0

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Starting from Developer Toolset 4.0 we have added the Eclipse PyDev tooling for writing and debugging Python applications. This article aims to give new users a whirlwind tour of some of the key features.

Installing and Configuring

PyDev is installed by default when you install the IDE component of DTS 4.0:

$ sudo yum install devtoolset-4-ide

Once you’ve launched Eclipse, the first thing you need to do is configure an interpreter to use. Open the preferences dialog by choosing “Preferences” from the “Window” menu, then navigate to the “PyDev -> Interpreters -> Python Interpreter” preference node. Simply hit the “Quick Auto-Config” button to automatically discover and configure the first Python interpreter that is encountered in your PATH.

Interpreter Preferences

It’s worth knowing that not only does PyDev work well with the default version of Python that ships with RHEL, it also works with the Python Software Collections. For example, if you’d like to work with Python 3 then you can also install the rh-python34 software collection:

$ sudo yum install rh-python3

Continue reading “Get Started: Eclipse and Python with PyDev in Developer Toolset 4.0”