Get started with Node.js v4 using Red Hat Software Collections 2.2 Beta

Node.js v4 is now available on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7 using Red Hat Software Collections 2.2 Beta. The Get Started with Node.js v4 guide has you covered even if you don’t know how to use Red Hat Software Collections (RHSCL) or how to access the beta. After enabling the RHSCL 2.2 Beta software repository on your system, you will be able to install node, npm, and up to 200 additional Node.js packages with a simple yum command.

Why use Red Hat Software Collections?

RHSCL enables you to install the latest development technologies using supported packages that can coexist with other versions such as those included with Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Using a separate software lifecycle for software collections allows Red Hat to deliver and support newer releases of software as they mature from their upstream projects. Many of the packages in RHSCL are updated annually and are supported for up to three years. Consider this in contrast to the packages included with Red Hat Enterprise Linux that are supported for up to ten years. As a developer, if you are wondering why you should care about supported packages, think about what you need to do the next time a critical vulnerability is discovered in one of the packages that the software you deliver depends upon.

Switch between multiple versions

RHSCL packages are installed in /opt/rh/collection-name. When you want to use a software collection, you add it to your environment (command search, library, and manual path) using scl enable collection-name. This allows you to install both Node.js v4 and v0.10 and easily switch between them.

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New beta: Software Collections 2.2 and Developer Toolset 4.1

Red Hat Developer Toolset has already been available for nearly four years and Red Hat Software Collections has been out for two and a half. We’ve seen excellent adoption of these as more and more developers and customers utilize the newer technologies that become available.

So, this week we announced more with these two new beta releases.

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Upgrading the GNU C Library within Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Occasionally, there’s a need for a new GNU C Library for a given application to run.  For example, some versions of the Google Chrome browser started to warn users on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 that future versions of Chrome would not support their operating system. The Chromium source code contained a version check, flagging all versions of the GNU C Library (glibc) older than 2.19 as obsolete. This check has since been relaxed to 2.17 (the version in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7), but it is still worth discussing what we can do to support application binaries in Red Hat Enterprise Linux which require a newer glibc version to run.

Distribution-specific binaries

Before discussing the feasibility of glibc upgrades, it is worth noting that there is a disconnect between how GNU/Linux distributions build the applications they ship as part of the distribution, and how independent software vendors (ISVs) build their application binaries.

Continue reading “Upgrading the GNU C Library within Red Hat Enterprise Linux”


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Deploying PSGI Applications using RHSCL Docker Containers

Red Hat Software Collections (RHSCL) 2.0 brings Perl 5.20 as a Docker image. This allows you to deploy Perl applications easily.

The basic idea is to combine your application code from Git tree and Red Hat’s rhscl/perl-520-rhel7 base image into an application image that will run your application in mod_perl environment. Your application can either be a simple Common Gateway Interface (CGI) script or a full-fledged Perl Web Server Gateway Interface (PSGI) application.

Following this step-by-step procedure will show you how to deploy a simple pastebin-like web service implemented as a PSGI application.

The Base Image

First we install docker package and start the docker service:

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Get Started: Eclipse and Python with PyDev in Developer Toolset 4.0

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Starting from Developer Toolset 4.0 we have added the Eclipse PyDev tooling for writing and debugging Python applications. This article aims to give new users a whirlwind tour of some of the key features.

Installing and Configuring

PyDev is installed by default when you install the IDE component of DTS 4.0:

$ sudo yum install devtoolset-4-ide

Once you’ve launched Eclipse, the first thing you need to do is configure an interpreter to use. Open the preferences dialog by choosing “Preferences” from the “Window” menu, then navigate to the “PyDev -> Interpreters -> Python Interpreter” preference node. Simply hit the “Quick Auto-Config” button to automatically discover and configure the first Python interpreter that is encountered in your PATH.

Interpreter Preferences

It’s worth knowing that not only does PyDev work well with the default version of Python that ships with RHEL, it also works with the Python Software Collections. For example, if you’d like to work with Python 3 then you can also install the rh-python34 software collection:

$ sudo yum install rh-python3

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Software Collections 2.1 now in beta – Adds Varnish Cache, nginx

Today, we are pleased to announce the beta availability of Red Hat Software Collections 2.1, Red Hat’s newest installment of open source web development tools, dynamic languages, and databases. Delivered on a separate lifecycle from Red Hat Enterprise Linux with a more frequent release cadence, Red Hat Software Collections bridges developer agility and production stability by helping to accelerate the creation of modern applications that can then be more confidently deployed into production.

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