Maintain Software Collections easily on thousands of machines using scl register


softwarecollections-logo-colorfulHere is a problem. Let’s have a company with dozens of developer workstations, while we need to maintain the same development environment on all of them.

We know the Software Collections, which store files from RPMs into /opt and thus allow us to install multiple versions of various software on the same machine, even on an enterprise platform like Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Installing packages in different versions could break things, so it is wise to use the Software Collections for that purpose.

Anyway, back to the developer workstations — we might for example set up a system to deploy the same environment stacks on multiple systems (Satellite, Puppet, Ansible), but when adding a new package to the set of available packages, we would still need to run commands on all the systems.

What may be much more handy is mounting the /opt/rh directory from one system to all the developer workstations (using NFS for example). We also can make the /opt/rh read-only, so clients cannot influence other clients.

So, let’s try it. First, we install a collection (in this case Python 3.4) on the NFS server:

Continue reading “Maintain Software Collections easily on thousands of machines using scl register”


For more information about Red Hat Software Collections or Red Hat Developer Toolset, visit developer.redhat.com/RHEL.


Red Hat Software Collections 2 – now generally available


Excellent news – Red Hat has announced the general availability of Red Hat Software Collections 2.softwarecollections-logo-colorful

You’ll see considerable additions to support multiple language versions. For example, it includes updates to “Python 2.7, continues to support Python 3.3 and also adds Python 3.4 – providing a fully-supported language library and blending developer agility with production stability.”

Continue reading “Red Hat Software Collections 2 – now generally available”


For more information about Red Hat Software Collections or Red Hat Developer Toolset, visit developer.redhat.com/RHEL.


Case study repost: Red Hat Software Collections – ScriptScribe


Scott and I first chatted last year about Software Collections when they first became available, and less than a year later he’s written up this great summary of his experience with them.


“Red Hat Software Collections

By Scott Merrill

In the beginning

“When I started working at CoverMyMeds, I inherited a server infrastructure that made sense for where the company was at the time. There was one full-time system administrator and a small group of developers. There were only a handful of production servers running a small collection of applications. The majority of applications were Ruby, and Ruby was installed onto the servers using RVM, the Ruby Version Manager.

“We had a number of PHP applications running on different versions of that language, including a custom RPM for a specific version of PHP for one app. The Red Hat default version of PHP was 5.3, which was already ancient by PHP standards.”

Continue reading “Case study repost: Red Hat Software Collections – ScriptScribe”


For more information about Red Hat Software Collections or Red Hat Developer Toolset, visit developer.redhat.com/RHEL.


Software Collections 2.0 now in BETA – new and shiny


softwarecollections-logo-colorfulIt seems like just a few months ago when we introduced Red Hat Software Collections 1.0 (RHSCL), followed by 1.1 and 1.2 will lots of additions and updates.

Today, Red Hat has announced Red Hat Software Collections 2.0 with a truck load of important languages, tools, databases and web servers – including the addition of a new component:  Passenger.  Here’s the list:

  • Python 3.4the latest stable, major release of Python 3 and includes a number of additional utilities and database connectors for MySQL
  • PHP 5.6 – featuring numerous improvements, additions and a streamlined upgrade path for migrating from past versions
  • Perl 5.20 – a recent stable release of Perl shipped with a set of additional utilities, scripts, and database connectors for MySQL and PostgreSQL
  • Ruby 2.2 – and, in its own collection, Rails 4.1 give users the ability to access and install an updated version of Ruby without necessarily having to install an updated version of Rails.
  • MySQL5.6 – inclusive of enhancements to InnoDB for higher transactional throughput, partitioning improvements for querying and managing huge tables, and better performance monitoring
  • MariaDB 10 – a recent stable release of this easy-to-adopt database alternative to MySQL
  • PostgreSQL 9.4 – featuring the new JSONB datatype, increased scalability with Logical Decoding, the foundation for new replication tools such as Bi-Directional Replication, and several additional enhancements that contribute to improved performance
  • MongoDB 2.6 – a high-performance, cross-platform document database features comprehensive core server enhancements, enhanced scalability and index intersection
  • NEW TO RHSCL: Passenger 4.0 – a modern web and application server for Ruby, Passenger 4.0 has been optimized for performance, memory usage and ease-of-use

Red Hat Software Collections 2.0 Beta also includes many updates and enhancements to existing collections, including:

  • Maven 3.0.5 – a recent stable release of the popular build automation tool for Java projects that describes how software is built and all associated dependencies
  • Python 2.7 – now includes python-wheel, python-pip, and all associated dependencies
  • Thermostat 1.2 – adds event-based profiling, an improved sampler profiler, Maven archetypes and visual improvements to the Swing client and charts
  • nginx 1.6 – a recent stable release of nginx, a high performance, open source HTTP sever and reverse proxy option
  • DevAssistant 0.9.3 – a useful tools for setting up development environments, publishing code and other related tasks, this latest, stable version includes several bug fixes and full backwards compatibility
  • Node.js 0.10.33 – previously only available through an unsupported tech preview, the latest stable release of this modern programming platform is now fully supported

All of the above are part of the majority of Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscriptions.

New to Software Collections?  Read about them on the product pages.

See the entire release here.

 


For more information about Red Hat Software Collections or Red Hat Developer Toolset, visit developer.redhat.com/RHEL.


Using Mock to build Python27 Software Collections packages for RHEL6


Have you wanted to use software collections but found packaging has kept you at bay? Tried rebuilding a package only to find it give you weird errors you’ve not seen before? In this blog post we’ll learn how to configure and use mock to build RPM packages for the Python 2.7 Software Collection. Along the way we’ll learn why we can’t use standard mock configurations, and what makes Software Collections (SCL) mock configurations different.

Python logo

Continue reading “Using Mock to build Python27 Software Collections packages for RHEL6″


For more information about Red Hat Enterprise Linux and other topics related to this article, visit one of these sites:  Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat Enterprise Linux Developer Program, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 is now generally available.

 



For more information about Red Hat Software Collections or Red Hat Developer Toolset, visit developer.redhat.com/RHEL.