Node.js 4.4, Python 3.5, and Ruby 2.3 Get Started guides on developers.redhat.com

On developers.redhat.com you can find short, focused guides to help you start developing with a number of Red Hat technologies. With the recent release of Red Hat Software Collections (RHSCL) 2.2, a number of Get Started guides have been updated to use the newest software collections, such as Node.js 4.4, Python 3.5, and Ruby 2.3.  These guides give you the steps you need to install the software and get to a simple “Hello, World” in a few minutes. The guides include a few additional package management examples to help you go farther.

Need a subscription that includes RHSCL?  Developers can get a no-cost Red Hat Enterprise Linux Developer Suite subscription for development purposes by registering and downloading through developers.redhat.com. We recommend you follow our Get Started Guide which covers downloading and installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux on a physical system or virtual machine (VM) using your choice of VirtualBox, VMware, Microsoft Hyper-V, or Linux KVM/Libvirt. For more information, see Frequently asked questions: no-cost Red Hat Enterprise Linux Developer Suite.

How to get Red Hat Software Collections

To try these using a traditional yum install on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, use these guides:

If you want to want to try building “Hello, World” in a container, a number of RHSCL packages are available as docker-formatted container images. Follow these guides on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7:

If you are running Microsoft Windows, Apple Mac OS X, Fedora, or CentOS, you can use the Red Hat Container Development Kit, a pre-built Red Hat Enterprise Linux virtual machine with docker, the OpenShift Enterprise v3 platform as a service, or a number of other container tools.

Learn more at DevNation 2016

Next week at DevNation 2016, Red Hat’s Langdon White is giving two presentations:

  • Software Collections: Easy access to the cutting edge
  • CDK 2: Docker, OpenShift Enterprise, and Kubernetes on your desktop

 


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Installing MongoDB on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

By Hemant Jain


MongoDB has evolved into one of the most popular open source “NoSQL” databases—so-called because they dispense with the tabular storage schema of relational databases like MySQL and Postgres. NoSQL databases offer a variety of advantages in many cases

The biggest advantage is that MongoDB databases don’t require developers to define schemas before adding data to a database. Instead, they use a flexible document-based model, similar to Python dictionaries or Ruby hashes. With MongoDB, you don’t need to spend time creating tables before you can process your data. That makes the NoSQL approach ideal for situations where you don’t know how much data you have to handle, what form it is in, or how quickly it is going to move around.

There’s a lot more to say about what makes MongoDB, and NoSQL in general, a better fit for some situations. (I could also write a great deal about when not to use NoSQL—and that’s  important, because despite NoSQL’s current trendiness, it’s not better in all contexts.)

But that’s all fodder for a separate blog post. For now, let’s move onto the meat of this post, which is how to install MongoDB on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) in order to take advantage of NoSQL databases.

Continue reading “Installing MongoDB on Red Hat Enterprise Linux”


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Get started with Node.js v4 using Red Hat Software Collections 2.2 Beta

Node.js v4 is now available on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7 using Red Hat Software Collections 2.2 Beta. The Get Started with Node.js v4 guide has you covered even if you don’t know how to use Red Hat Software Collections (RHSCL) or how to access the beta. After enabling the RHSCL 2.2 Beta software repository on your system, you will be able to install node, npm, and up to 200 additional Node.js packages with a simple yum command.

Why use Red Hat Software Collections?

RHSCL enables you to install the latest development technologies using supported packages that can coexist with other versions such as those included with Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Using a separate software lifecycle for software collections allows Red Hat to deliver and support newer releases of software as they mature from their upstream projects. Many of the packages in RHSCL are updated annually and are supported for up to three years. Consider this in contrast to the packages included with Red Hat Enterprise Linux that are supported for up to ten years. As a developer, if you are wondering why you should care about supported packages, think about what you need to do the next time a critical vulnerability is discovered in one of the packages that the software you deliver depends upon.

Switch between multiple versions

RHSCL packages are installed in /opt/rh/collection-name. When you want to use a software collection, you add it to your environment (command search, library, and manual path) using scl enable collection-name. This allows you to install both Node.js v4 and v0.10 and easily switch between them.

Helpful Resources


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

Take advantage of your Red Hat Developers membership and download RHEL today at no cost.

shadowman solo from external web 265x200

New beta: Software Collections 2.2 and Developer Toolset 4.1

Red Hat Developer Toolset has already been available for nearly four years and Red Hat Software Collections has been out for two and a half. We’ve seen excellent adoption of these as more and more developers and customers utilize the newer technologies that become available.

So, this week we announced more with these two new beta releases.

Continue reading “New beta: Software Collections 2.2 and Developer Toolset 4.1”


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Take advantage of your Red Hat Developers membership and download RHEL today at no cost.

gnu logo

Upgrading the GNU C Library within Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Occasionally, there’s a need for a new GNU C Library for a given application to run.  For example, some versions of the Google Chrome browser started to warn users on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 that future versions of Chrome would not support their operating system. The Chromium source code contained a version check, flagging all versions of the GNU C Library (glibc) older than 2.19 as obsolete. This check has since been relaxed to 2.17 (the version in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7), but it is still worth discussing what we can do to support application binaries in Red Hat Enterprise Linux which require a newer glibc version to run.

Distribution-specific binaries

Before discussing the feasibility of glibc upgrades, it is worth noting that there is a disconnect between how GNU/Linux distributions build the applications they ship as part of the distribution, and how independent software vendors (ISVs) build their application binaries.

Continue reading “Upgrading the GNU C Library within Red Hat Enterprise Linux”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

Take advantage of your Red Hat Developers membership and download RHEL today at no cost.

containers for grown-ups

Deploying PSGI Applications using RHSCL Docker Containers

Red Hat Software Collections (RHSCL) 2.0 brings Perl 5.20 as a Docker image. This allows you to deploy Perl applications easily.

The basic idea is to combine your application code from Git tree and Red Hat’s rhscl/perl-520-rhel7 base image into an application image that will run your application in mod_perl environment. Your application can either be a simple Common Gateway Interface (CGI) script or a full-fledged Perl Web Server Gateway Interface (PSGI) application.

Following this step-by-step procedure will show you how to deploy a simple pastebin-like web service implemented as a PSGI application.

The Base Image

First we install docker package and start the docker service:

Continue reading “Deploying PSGI Applications using RHSCL Docker Containers”


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